It looks like there is some bad news for South Americans, at least according to WikiLeaks frontman Julian Assange who claims that the NSA is intercepting 98% of all South American communications.

Ninety-eight percent of Latin American communications are intercepted by the NSA while passing through the United States to the world,” Assange said in an interview with the publication, according to Tech Crunch.

A large focus of Assange was related to the large swaths of information being collected by American tech companies, specifically Google and Facebook, and their relationship with the U.S. intelligence communities.”

WikiLeaks has continued to be a huge pain in the neck for the NSA and they continue to dive deeper into top secret information. Lately they have been concentrating on Latin America according to the Tech Crunch report. The report says that the company also released documents that insinuate that the NSA has been spying on the Rousseff administration in Brazil.

“The leaked information included partial phone numbers and identifying information relating to 29 Brazilian government officials whose activities were being monitored,” reported Lucas Matney of Tech Crunch.

“These documents add to a growing list of American allies, including France and Germany, that are being spied on by the NSA.”

“Google and Facebook are in the business of being a sort of spy agency. It’s a business model. Collect all the information you can from as many people worldwide as possible, using free services,” Assange said in a phone interview from the Embassy of Ecuador in London,” according to RT

The WikiLeaks hackers seem relentless when it comes to proving just how involved the NSA is not only in Latin American and South American countries’ communications but communication networks worldwide. Assange is seen as a hero to many including many journalists due to his handling of not only finding, but also releasing sensitive information. He’s also scrutinized by many who believe that his approach was unwarranted and unethical.

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